Attention Management

Recently, I was preparing for a management presentation I’m giving next month.  One of the topics is “time management.”  I’ve never taken a time management class myself, and I have to admit that the term fills me with a vague discomfort.  It also evokes images of fat notebook-like organizers filled with lists upon lists of meetings, tasks to do, tasks completed, priorities, calls to make, and so on.

I don’t want to go there. It’s not me and I don’t do it myself so how can I preach it?  Instead I’m going to share a general  coaching approach to time management. You can use it on yourself or when coaching others.

  • First, don’t conceptualize it as time management at all.  We can’t manage time – it’s a force outside our control.  However, we can manage our attention and our priorities.  So think of the issue as “where do I focus my attention” or “how do I manage my priorities.”
  • Second, be intentional.  Think through your roles and tasks, how you want and need to balance them, where you want to direct your attention, and what your destination and goals are.  With intention, you have a framework for making decisions on how to spend the time you have. Without intention or a goal, you end up being only reactive.  Most people are part of a larger organization, so external forces – your job description, the organization’s mission and values, and your leadership’s views will necessarily be part of this process.
  • Third, figure out where your attention is currently going and realign it to better meet your goals and priorities.  You can do this in any number of ways and in greater or lesser detail.  The important thing is to be conscious of what you’re doing so you can make the changes that are necessary.

Of course this sounds easier than it is, but as a macro approach, it works.  You might also want to look into the Stephen Covey “time management matrix,” which is an invaluable tool for focusing your attention on what is important, not just on what is urgent — or seems so.

As for the details, you can work those out yourself. Electronic PDA, paper and pencil, fat leather-bound organizer, post-its, color coding, whatever … it’s your choice. What matters is having a framework.

Let me know if this works for you!  ~Amy Stephson

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